Category Archives: Ways to Make Money

April 2021 Money News

Time for another monthly money news update!

Women & Money Management Today at Vanderbilt’s Women’s Center

I have some news for the students and faculty at Vanderbilt!

My colleague Joyce and I will be speaking at an event today at The Women’s Center. This will be a live, online event  at 4p Central today, April 5, 2021. We’ll be reviewing real-life money management tricks, while actually addressing the significant financial obstacles women face at nearly every turn within our society.

We hope to see you there! Here’s where you can join us.

Joyce and I may have more exciting news coming up around the corner, too. Stay tuned!

Taxes in the Pandemic.

There are so many changes to taxes this year. And next year. These changes are highly likely to work in your favor in a big way.

Last month we talked about an important large, refundable credit available to the self-employed.

Here are some other big, important changes you should be aware of since the last time we spoke:

  • Filings for the 2020 tax year are no longer due on April 15, 2021. Instead, they’re due May 17, 2021. Here are some ways to file your taxes for free.
  • The first $10,200 you received in unemployment in 2020 no longer counts as taxable income.
  • There are changes to the Child Tax Credit and Additional Child Tax credit that both make it larger and make a larger portion of it refundable. You may expect to see some of these refunds for the 2021 tax year come early — as early as this summer.
  • The Child and Dependent Care Credit has also become refundable, larger and claimable for an additional year.
  • There are BIG changes to premium credits for those who pay for an ACA health insurance plan. It is extremely likely that these changes work in your favor no matter how much or how little money you make, and can result in a larger tax refund or lower overall tax burden. Learn more here.

You got evicted. Now what?

The best way to avoid an eviction is to stop it before it goes to court.

However, that’s not always possible. The eviction crisis has only gotten worse in the pandemic, and it’s something no one should ever have to go through. If you have, I sat down with an expert to help you figure out how, exactly, you can recover with an eviction on your record.

Side Hustle

Looking for a potentially lucrative side hustle? That you can do remotely?

I talked with Bryson Honjo to learn more about the sneaker reselling industry. You can catch the full interview here.

Send your questions!

Confused by all the big financial changes we’ve seen from our government over the past year? Have a specific question you’d like answered? Shoot me an email and I’ll try to get it answered for you in the next round up!

Until next time, friends.

March 2021 Money News

Oh, boy.

It’s been a while, friends.

This past year has tested all of us in ways we couldn’t have possibly imagined just twelve months ago. For me — like so many of you  — that has meant I’ve had to change the way I move. Slow down the intensity and speed at which I share with you here.

Whether I like it or not.

But just because I haven’t been posting as regularly doesn’t mean I’ve been idle. In fact, there are some key bits of news I’ve been wanting to let you in on lately.

So let’s look at some financial stuff.

Upcoming Events

Know what’s coming back in 2021?

Speaking gigs with yours truly!

They’re all remote for now. Holding onto hope that the world will look different soon and we can see each other IRL again.

But in the meantime…

Busy Moms Special Needs Summit

Picture of blond woman on blue background. Text reads 'Financial Management and Resources for parents of disabled children. March 8-12, 2021 Brynne Conroy busymomsspecialneeds.com

This Spring, I was asked to speak at the Busy Moms Special Needs Summit. It’s a FREE online conference that runs from March 8 through March 12.

I KNOW!!! It’s already the 9th. I’m the worst. The good news is that each talk is available for 48 hours for FREE, so you’ve still got time to get caught up on anything you’ve missed.

The conference doesn’t necessarily focus on money. Rather, the focus is special needs parenting in general.

However, money can be a massive obstacle when you’re raising a disabled child. So that’s what you and I will be talking about.

You can catch my presentation at 1p on Friday, March 12, where we’ll discuss financial tools and resources for parents of disabled children age 21 and younger.

A lot of parents are only ever introduced to the medical model of disability. That’s problematic both from the perspective of how we raise our children in the day-to-day and how we understand advocacy efforts within financial and medical systems.

So we’ll start off briefly over-viewing the difference between the medical and the more cultural models of disability, and how you can keep those in mind as you’re making life decisions on behalf of your child.

Then, we’ll delve into some nerdy stuff about the cash side of things, like:

What if I can’t make it live?

If you’re like,

Lol. She thinks I’m going to be able to watch a conference live? Even with the 48 hours, I’m never going to be able to make it match my COVID schedule. Letting me know at the last minute like that.

That’s cool.

Because luckily, the brains behind the conference, Tiffiny of 8 Busy Bees, has set up a VIP Access Pass which you can purchase. It will allow you to watch the content at your leisure whenever is convenient for you.

With the VIP Access Pass, you’ll also get bonuses like:

  • 6-month access to the Busy Moms – Breakthrough Community.
  • Coaching on how to visit Disney with disabled children. Disney is notoriously not good at accommodating families with different needs.
  • Evaluating Your Self-Care Needs Workbook.
  • And tons more.

Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center

I’m also excited to announce that my colleague Joyce and I will be speaking at the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center at Vanderbilt University this Spring. You will have to be associated with the university to attend. If you are, I hope to see you there!

You can keep up with the Women’s Center’s news and upcoming events on Insta.

This will be a live, online event on April 5, 2021. We’ll be reviewing real-life money management tricks, while actually addressing the significant financial obstacles women face at nearly every turn within our society.

Self-Employed? Don’t miss this tax hack for the 2020 filing year.

Time for a pandemic money hack!

If you were self-employed in 2020 in any way — including from a side hustle, even if you’ve got a nine to five — there is a massive tax credit you should absolutely include in your filings.

It can be worth up to $15,110 per self-employed person.

And it’s refundable.

That means if you qualify, you could be getting a boatload of cash back in your pocket through this tax refund.

I wrote a whole article dedicated to this tax credit for Insider.

Please read it. Please file for it if you qualify. And please file an amended return if you’ve already filed so you can get the cash you’re owed.

You deserve every penny. And I want to see you get every last cent.

Here are some options to file your taxes for free.

Get financial assistance for your medical bills.

Now more than ever, every American should know their rights when it comes to hospital systems and financial billing.

At many hospitals across the country, average Americans are entitled to financial assistance with their medical bills — even if they have insurance.

THANK YOU, ACA!!!

Check out the latest story I did on this topic for The Penny Hoarder.

It could just be the read that saves you from drowning in unnecessary medical debt.

See you soon!

I’ll be checking back in! I’ve missed the community here at Femme Frugality, and want to thank you all for sticking with me through all these years. Perhaps especially this last one.

 

 

 

 

 

Earn $500 by Celebrating MLK Day This Weekend

MLK Monument in DC. A mountainous bulk of stone. On the front it reads, 'Out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.' MLK's profile is carved into the side of the rock. From this angle, it looks like he is looking directly at the Washington Monument.

Today I’m excited to bring you a potential money-earning opp that can also help you celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day!

The NAACP in Indiana County, Pennsylvania is hosting a free virtual event on Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 11a.

At the event, you’ll be able to enjoy spoken word performances, reflections of Dr. King, a performance by the Indiana Community Children’s Choir, and special guest artist Tieshay Cheryl.

What’s this about $500?

Part of the event is a spoken word contest. The top four finalists will perform at the event virtually on Saturday. The grand prize for this contest is $500 for one winner.

To enter the contest, you’ll need to submit a 90-second video across any of the following categories:

  • Spoken word.
  • Poetry.
  • Interpretive dance.
  • Contemporary or pop music.
  • Theatrical skit.

Your video should focus on the event’s theme, which is Equality, Action, Acceptance, Progress. Performances must be culturally, educationally and entertainingly expressed for a diverse audience.

Do I have to live in Pennsylvania to enter?

No. The beautiful thing about this event being virtual is that entries can be accepted from anywhere.

That, and remote events keep you and your community safe during the pandemic.

What’s the deadline?

The deadline submission has been extended. Your submission must be received by January 14, 2021.

Don’t be confused if you see printed materials with other dates. The deadline has been extended, even if some of the printed materials haven’t been updated.

How do I enter?

You can find all the entry information on the event page. You’ll need to submit this form with your video.

Can I attend the event if I don’t enter the competition?

Yes! The event is free and open to anyone. You just have to register by January 14, 2021 to get access to the Zoom link.

The event is free, and donations are appreciated. You can donate whether you’re able to attend the event or not via $naacppa on CashApp.

How to Make Money as a Translator

Want to make money as a translator? Today, Rebecca Brown shows us how.

A white box is drawn around the words, 'Make extra money as a translator.' Below is pictured white Japanese lamps with black lettering.

I am a native English speaker. But thanks to my multicultural family, I happen to speak German at a near-native level. I have managed to turn my bilingual background into a fruitful career.

Prior to jumping into the translating industry, my grandparents had been the only ones to capitalize on my translating skills. They called me over every time they bought a new appliance and struggled to make sense of the English user manual.

I managed to slowly break into the industry by translating for people in my network for some pocket money. But the road would have been much easier if I had someone to answer a few how’s and why’s.

So, to help those who are looking to make some extra money as a translator, I’ll address some of the most important FAQs related to translation.

What Does a Professional Translator Do?

A professional translator translates written text from one language into another. Professional translators translate books, subtitles, blogs, emails, legal documents, etc.

You may be wondering: Why do we still need translators when we have Google Translate?

To be a professional translator, you need to be able to relay the meaning, style, and tone of the original source in your translations. That’s something Google Translate cannot yet do reliably.

You need to keep the facts and ideas from the original text accurate, and the sentences must flow as well as the original. A professional translator must consider slang and other expressions and cultural references that do not translate literally.

Translation is not the same as interpretation. While translators translate written words, interpreters translate spoken language. To be a translator, you don’t necessarily have to speak the original language fluently, but you must be able to read it and write it impeccably.

Translation is also not to be confused with transliteration. Transliteration is the act of converting words or letters from the alphabet of one language to another. Transliteration just converts a text into a new format. It doesn’t render the meaning of the text. For instance, “חֲנֻכָּה” is the Hebrew word for the Jewish holiday called Festival of Lights. The English transliteration of the word is “Hanukkah.”

How Do I Become a Professional Translator?

Being bilingual or multilingual is a great start, but it’s not enough to become a professional translator. As mentioned, translation requires skills that go beyond understanding and speaking a language. You also need sound research skills, in-depth cultural knowledge, excellent writing skills, proofreading skills, computing and CAT (computer-assisted translation software) skills. Since most translators get paid by the word, you also need good time management skills.

To gain those skills, first, you need to get specialized training. If you are looking for schools that can help you prepare to work as a translator, check out:

Get certified as a professional translator.

The next step is to get certified. Not all translation gigs require you to have a certification, but you will have a much easier time finding work if you become ATA certified. The ATA certification is a highly regarded credential in the US.

The Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT) is another great resume builder. Be sure to check whether your state offers accreditation programs.

When you gain experience, you can specialize in a certain niche and get an industry-specific certification. These credentials usually target interpreters, but they are great proof of your expertise nonetheless. For instance, you can get the CMI credential from the National Board of Certification for Medical Interpreters.

How Much Money Can I Make as a Translator?

Most translation jobs pay per word, but my tip is to try to convert the rate-by-word to an hourly rate. The average translator can translate 300 to 600 words per hour.

Let’s say that you are a beginner and that it takes you 3 hours to translate 1000 words. If your goal is to make at least $20 per hour, you wouldn’t want to accept jobs that pay under $0.06 per word.

In the US, the average hourly wage of a translator is around $24. More experienced translators make around $33. But your hourly rate will depend on your experience and location, as well as the languages you know. When starting out, you can expect to make between $15 to $20 an hour.

The highest paying region for translators is Washington D.C. On average, a translator in D.C. makes $38 an hour.

Generally, translators for these languages are in great demand, so they pay better:

  • German.
  • Arabic.
  • French.
  • Chinese.

For instance, German translators in the US make between $26 to $33 an hour on average. The rates for Italian and Spanish are generally lower, but these two languages can still bring translators consistent income.

Where Can I Find Work as a Professional Translator?

I’ve come to learn that attending industry events, such as workshops, meetups, and conferences, is one of the best ways to promote yourself as a freelancer and find new clients. However, face-to-face networking isn’t always a possibility, even though it can be a great way of landing a job.

Some online platforms where you can find work as a translator include:

  • Smartcat.com
  • Proz.com
  • TranslatorsCafe.com
  • Upwork.com
  • Freelancer.com
  • Fiverr.com
  • PeoplePerHour.com

If you apply for a job at an agency, they will likely give you a test piece of about 200 to 600 words. Beware of agencies that require you to translate a test piece that is longer than 600 words. Some dodgy agencies will give you long test pieces to translate, but they are actually looking to get some client work done for free.

Is Translating a Good Side Hustle?

Translating is an excellent side hustle if you speak more than one language. It may not be the best-paying gig out there — at least not for those who are just starting out. But the extra money is nothing to shrug off considering the low startup and overhead costs.

Many — if not most — translators work from home, and the job is pretty flexible. This is a major plus point in times of non-essential business closures and social distancing.

Picture of Rebecca Brown


I’m Rebecca, a translator, avid traveler, and a bookworm. My job has given me the amazing opportunity to travel to dozens of countries around the world, and writing on Rough Draft gives me a chance to try to showcase some of them.

Get Compensated for Your European Flight Delay

This post is in collaboration with Click2Refund.

You know that European vacation you took in 2017?

The one where your journey home turned into a three-day sojourn thanks to flight delays and missed connections?

You might be owed money for that trip thanks to a European law.

No insignificant sum, either. Depending on the length of the delay, you may be owed up to $700.

You can either attempt to claim this money yourself, or enlist the help of professionals like Click2Refund.

What is EU Regulation 261/2004?

EU regulation 261/2004 is a European law that protects passengers against flight disruptions that are the airline’s fault.

When your flight is delayed or cancelled within 14 days of scheduled departure, European airlines or airlines departing from the EU have an obligation to compensate you for your time and inconvenience under EU regulation 261/2004 — except in ‘extraordinary circumstances.’

This compensation can vary from €250 – €600, which is $293-$704USD at the time of writing.

You can also claim this compensation if you are denied boarding when the aircraft is overbooked.

How much compensation can I get?

The amount of compensation you receive varies depending on the length of the flight and the length of the delay.

The delay must be more than 3 hours in order to qualify for any compensation. If your flight is:

  • 1,500 km or more, you may qualify for €250.
  • 1,500-3,000 km, you may qualify for €400.
  • 3,500 km or more, you may qualify for €300.

If your delay was 4 hours or more on a flight of over 3,500 km, you may be entitled to €600.

For reference, it’s about 5,585 km from London to New York City, and a little over 7,000 km from CDG to ATL.

Do airlines have to compensate for cancelled flights?

Yes. Under the same regulation, airlines must provide you with a ticket refund or a replacement flight. They also have to feed you while you’re waiting, and cover your hotel if necessary.

If the cancellation happens within 14 days of your scheduled departure, you may also be eligible for flight compensation as outlined above.

Is EU 261 compensation per person or per purchase?

Per person. If you bought four tickets for your family, each person would be eligible for their own individual compensation check.

Does EU regulation 261/2004 apply during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Yes and no.

EU 261 still applies during the Coronavirus pandemic. If your flight is delayed or cancelled due to circumstances the airline reasonably could have controlled, you’re still entitled to compensation.

But if your flight was cancelled or delayed due to a travel ban or warning related to the virus, you aren’t necessarily entitled to compensation. The airline must comply with current health and travel guidelines. These qualify as extraordinary circumstances the airline cannot control or predict.

How long do I have to file a claim under EU regulation 261/2004?

It depends on the country of departure.

The EU country that offers the shortest time frame to file your initial claim is Romania. You only have six months.

Other member countries are far more generous with their statutes of limitations.

Here are the EU countries where the statue of limitations extends to only two years:

  • Croatia.
  • Iceland.
  • Italy.
  • Malta.
  • Slovakia.
  • Slovenia.
  • Switzerland.
  • The Netherlands.

If your flight is departing from one of these EU countries, you have three years to file your initial claim:

  • Austria.
  • Czech Republic.
  • Denmark.
  • Estonia.
  • Finland.
  • Germany.
  • Latvia.
  • Norway.
  • Portugal.

Here are the EU countries where you have up to five years to file your initial EU 261 claim:

  • Bulgaria.
  • France.
  • Greece.
  • Hungary.
  • Scotland.
  • Spain.

In these countries, you have up to six years:

  • Cyprus.
  • Ireland.
  • The UK (unless your flight left from Scotland.)

Lithuania, Luxenbourg and Sweden allow for up to 10 years. Amazingly, there is no statue of limitations if your delayed flight left from Poland.

How do I file an EU 261 claim?

There are a few different levels to making an EU 261 claim. The first option is to contact the airline that operated the delayed flight. They should be able to tell you their procedure for submitting a written claim.

If your claim with the airline is denied or not responded to within two months, you can then escalate things to the national enforcement bureau in whichever country the flight departed from.

For example, in the UK, you would contact the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

At this point, the airline can choose whether or not they want to take the claim to court. This is where things start to get more difficult if your live outside the jurisdiction, as you’ll incur not only legal fees, but also potential travel costs.

Get help filing your EU 261 claim.

If doing all this sounds like a pain, you can use a service like Click2Refund. Click2Refund handles your claim for you, from initial contact with the airline to court — should things go that far.

You only get charged if they win your claim. Then, the fee is 25%.

This fee is in line with what other similar service providers charge, though many competitors charge additional administrative fees in addition to a 25% fee — making Click2Refund one of the best deals on the market.

In this time when work and money is so disjointed, a claim from an old cancelled flight could help smooth out your budget. Check and see if yours qualifies here.