Get Free Textbooks with a Special Allowance

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 Erm, did someone say free textbooks? Doing this next semester.

When you’re trying to improve your situation, you come up against a lot of obstacles. Maybe you got into school to further your education, but, especially if you have children, you can’t afford to go without working–which conflicts with your class schedule.

You can combat this by applying for scholarships that will cover your costs above and beyond tuition.

After you have those scholarships, you have another major hindrance: textbooks. They’re crazy expensive, especially if you have a narcissistic professor who wrote their own and only publishes through the school. In a lot of situations, you can find ways to get textbooks for cheap, but sometimes the school bookstore is the only option.

If you’re truly struggling with money, there may be a way for you to get free textbooks. You may be able to get a special allowance (SPAL) through your state welfare office to get these costs covered.

How to Use a SPAL to Get Free Textbooks

In Pennsylvania, the Special Allowance Program (or SPAL) is available to those who are on food stamps or cash assistance. In order to qualify, you mus be willing or required to participate in an employment training program, including, but not necessarily limited to, college.

These SPALs can help pay for books, transportation and even qualification or certification tests.

If you do not live in Pennsylvania, that does not mean SPALs are not available. It just means that I’m not as familiar with the system in your state.

To get the SPAL forms you will need to go into your welfare office and talk to a case worker. Ask them for a Special Allowance packet, making sure you let them know why you are asking.

They will give you a packet of paperwork including some forms for your school to fill out and a job/career plan outline. There will be a couple of additional personal forms for you to fill out, too.

From here, you’ll want to take the forms to your school’s financial aid office. When they fill them out, make sure you also get a copy of your current class schedule and verification that the books and other materials you need are required to take each course.

Now you can mail in all the paperwork. If you’re approved, you will get the Special Allowance to use at your school’s bookstore for free textbooks. You must use it within 14 days of issuance, and then submit your receipt to the welfare office so they can verify that you used all the money for its intended purpose.

In that packet, you should have also received a monthly attendance worksheet. You will need your professors to verify that you are attending class by the 5th of each following month.

Say you’ve filled out the form for February. You will need to submit it to the welfare office by the 5th of March. Make sure you keep up on your paperwork or you could end up owing all that textbook money back.

Your experience may vary a little from the above. First of all, this is based off of personal research. I did not qualify for a SPAL when I was going to school, but you can bet I tried. Because free textbooks would have helped a lot.

Additionally, if you’re not in the state of Pennsylvania, the availability of special allowances may differ, or be nonexistent. That doesn’t mean it’s not worth researching, though. Free textbooks can save you hundreds or even more than $1,000 per semester–and that adds up.

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5 thoughts on “Get Free Textbooks with a Special Allowance

  1. Pingback: Combating the Disproportionate Rise of Textbook Prices | Femme Frugality

  2. Done by Forty

    What a cool program. These sort of resources warm my heart: we ought to do all we can to assist our youth who are trying to get degrees.

    When I was in school, I took books out of the libraries whenever I could. Being an English major, a lot of our textbooks were novels, books of poems/plays, anthologies, stuff like that. So if you happen to be in that tiny niche, hey, leverage the library.

    Reply
    1. Femme

      For sure. I didn’t qualify for this program, but if you’re low-income you might. Might even be able to swing it even if you don’t qualify for FAFSA because of age/parental income requirements.

      I definitely advocate using the library! The reserve section was my best friend—saved hundreds upon hundreds that way.

      Reply
  3. Money Beagle

    Interesting idea. I remember back when I went to school that books were outrageously expensive. With everything involved in education having continued to go up in cost at ridiculous rates, I would have to assume textbooks are higher priced than ever. Any little bit of potential savings has to be looked at.

    Reply
    1. femmefrugality Post author

      For sure. I’m pretty sure if you qualify for this program they’re 100% covered, but again, there are variances.

      Reply

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